Cars we would like to tow

CARS WE WOULD LIKE TO TOW

At Sunshine Tow Truck and Car Towing, we don’t just enjoy our job, we love cars in general.

We often dream about coming across cars we need to tow, great cars that the owners would pay us back by letting us take them out for a spin. 

This is those cars.

CARS WE WOULD LIKE TO TOW

Ford GT

Based on the GT40 racing car, production started in 2004 and released in 2005 for only a few years.  We love the look of these beasts and the history of the GT40 and were stoked when they started a comeback when production commenced again in 2016.

This beast can hit 100 kilometres an hour in 3.8 seconds and can max out at 330 kilometres.  The engine is a supercharged 5.4 litre V8 and as you can guess is a complete fuel guzzler.

The chassis is engineered to precision to give it enough downforce and take as much out of the cornering as possible.  Of course what great design wouldn’t be complete without butterfly doors to impress your friends when you rock up to the important party.

Outside of just about yours and everybody you know’s price range, you’re not going to see many of them about however and we have defiantly never had the chance to tow one, not that we would like to.  We would love the chance to drive one however.

Details (First Generation)

Chassis

2-door coupé

Engine       

5.4 L Supercharged V8

Power output      

647 horse powerp (482 kW)

Transmission      

6-speed manual

Pontiac Firebird

The earlier the better, the Pontiac Firebird (originally to be named the banshee) has been around 1967 and was unfortunately discontinued in 2002.  Originally built as a competitor to Ford’s  Mustang and Mercury Cougar and Chevrolet’s Camaro, it was more than a worthy competitor. 

Regardless of the generation, the chassis and shape have always looked flash and complete the perfect mix between muscle car and sports coupe. 

The difference to the other cars of similar stature at the time was the elongated hood, purposely made five inches longer to set it apart and mark it as difference.  This also gave it better balance by pushing the driver further back in the chassis and form the wheel base.

The comfort level was also buffed compared to the competitors of the time making for a better all-round drive.

We love the look of these cars but have never had the chance to drive one so if you happen to own one, make sure you break down nearby and we will tow you for free on the chance to give your car a drive once it’s up and running again.

You won’t see many of the older cars about these days with the estimated priced of a 60’s firebird taking you to over sixty thousand dollars ($60,000). 

Details (Original model)

Chassis

2 door coupe with convertible option

Engine

3.8 – 6.0 Litres Pontiac V8

Power Output

320 horse power

Tansmission

2 – 3 speed automatic or 3 – 4 speed manual

Ford Mustang

Here’s one we’ve actually towed before.  In fact various models over the year.  There is hardly a more standard classic that is so widely known world over than the Ford Mustang.

An instant success when introduce in 1964, the first generation was manufactured until 1973.  At the time it was one of the first cars known as a “Pony Car” – a car that was considered a little compact, stylish with a sporty look yet still affordable.  With their longer than average hood and a shorter deck, we generally would call them either a coupe, sports ca or muscle car by today’s standard.

The first model was estimated to have sold over one hundred thousand models (100, 000) in the first year alone. 

While the style has changed over the years, from the cliché 80’s look to the square more boring 90’s look, the recent models have breathed new life back in to the Mustang name, and they are once again looked on as an attractive affordable model for a sports car.

Original Model

Chassis

2 – door coupe (convertible option)

Engine

2.8 – 4.7 Litre I6 or V8

Power Output

202kW for the 4.7 litre engine

Transmission

3 or 4 speed manual

3 speed automatic

Current Model

Chassis

2 door with convertible option

Engine

2.3 litre I4

5.0 litre V8

Power Output

339 Kw

Transmission

6 speed manual or automatic

Holden Torana

Not always a sports or muscle car but still a classic bit of Australian history.  Meaning “to fly” in a local aboriginal language, many a young driver almost did in those days.  OR at least they drove them like they felt like the were flying.

Released in 1967, this popular make was manufactured until 1980 and was boosted with a performance model released from 1970.  This was the popular model before the release of the commodore which is still available today.

The models grew ever more powerful as did there popularity as holden recognised that those that wanted to buy them ranged from people wanting a family or a solid, classy yet affordable car with guts.  Sometimes, there were those who wanted both equally in the one car.

While they are getting harder and harder to find, the Torana is starting to become a rare and classic model that brings with it a wealth of memories of those that grew up in its most popular era.

The Torana was the little brother of the Monaro, and between the two made a lunch chunk of Australian’s automotive history.

1974 LX Model

Chassis

3 door hatchback

4 door sedan

Engine

2.85 Litre I6 –

5.0 Litre OHV8

Power Output

179 Kw

216 horsepower

Transmission

4 speed manual

Holden Monaro

.First manufactured in 1968, the car was available for a decade, when it stopped being produced in 1977, pathing a way for the now more common Holden Commodore.

An Australian made muscle car – the Monaro was immensely popular and the perfect answer for those Aussies that wanted a home grown version of their own sports or pony car.  With slick looks and a huge bonnet, it was an instant success. 

The first generation made a name for itself and are harder to find these days, but a complete make over ensure the success of the model would go down in the history books.  The appearance of the Holden Monaro HQ GTS, with two wide stripes on the hood came to symbolise what a muscle or sports car should be and what is should look like.

Production of the unit actually ran until 1978 but without the name Monaro attached before being discontinued for the Holden Commodore.

A third generation was released in 2001 and while the specs under the hoods seemed to be superior to competing models at the same price range, the look was more standardised to modern sedans, reducing the appeal and popularity.

Together with it’s littler brother, the Torano, the Holden Monaro, made a lunch chunk of Australian’s automotive history for over a decade.

First generation

Chassis

2 door coupe

Engine

2.6 litre L6 – 5.7 Litre V8

Power Output

224Kw for the 534 litre

Transmission

3 speed automatic

4 speed manual

Holden Kingswood

Okay, we will admit, this is only here because of fond memories.  It’s not a sports car or a muscle car, but we still think it a thing of beauty – only because a certain someone’s friend’s mother used to drive one when we were kids.  Oh, and it has to be purple.  We have only towed a few over the years as they are a rare breed now but I think most people who grew up with one always ahd a place in their heart for the ever hard working family car made right here in Australia.

Also available in an amazing looking panel van these are an old classic that wouldn’t stop in the day, and if for some reason they did, you could fix it yourself (or at least know someone who could).

Commencing in 1968 as part of the infamous HK series, it was released with a larger and heavier body than any previous Holden range and the very first V8 (a 5.0 litre V8).  Manufacturing finally ceased in 1984.

It’s a shame that standard sedans and every day family cars don’t look like this these days

Original generation

Chassis

4 door sedan

Engine

2123 cc I6

Power Output

67Kw  90 Horse power

Transmission

3 spped manual

Lamborghini Diablo

When everybody in school asked for a Ferrari, we always wanted a Lamborghini.  Okay, so it mostly had to-do with the shape and the outward opening butterfly doors.

The Diablo is the cliché, everyday Lamborghini from the 90s that generally people think of when people mention the 90’s car manufacturer.

First released in 1990 the car was discontinued in 2001 to the disappointment of thousands of people who could actually never afford one in the first place.

Designed to look fast and aerodynamic, Lamborghini must have hit the sweet spot as Diablo posters could be found world over on the walls of teenage boys, ironically, who also would never be able to afford one.

This classic sports car though wasn’t cheap, it’s original asking price $240, 000 (US).  There’s a reason you don’t see them around much.

And yes, well admit, we can honestly say we’ve never had a chance to tow one.

Lamborghini Diablo SE30 model

Chassis

2 door sports coupe

Engine

5.7 litre or 6.0 litre V12

Power Output

530 KW 523 horse power

Transmission

5 speed manual

Lamborghini Egoista

Honestly, we don’t want to tow this car because we want to drive it.  It looks like something Homer Simpson would design (maybe they actually stole it off him) and wanting to see one up close is more a curiosity.  Like finding a strange looking bug when you were a kid.

With the name Lamborghini in it, and it’s model an Egotsta (containing the word Ego), you know that’s it’s not going to come cheaply.  Egoista actually means selfish and was actually promoted on that basis.

You won’t find one in the streets however as this beast really is a concept car, and even if it wasn’t, you would have to fork out $4 million dollars to get a hold of one.

Did we mention it only seats one person?  That’s right, true to its selfish nature, you can’t even give someone a lift to the shops in it.  The sine driver’s seat is actually located centrally in the vehicle with little room for anyone else.

Before we go, let’s not forget about the extra benefits though.    The body and wheels are actually made out of antiradar materials, so if you ever find yourself airborne in it (a possibility I suppose), NASA can’t track you.  I wonder if that works on police radars?

If you know anybody who get’s one of these, make them your very best friend.

Chassis

Single seat coupe weird thingy

Engine

5.2 Litre V10

Power Output

447 Kw 600 horse power

Aston Martin DB5

OK, let’s get this straight.  We love this car.  It would have made this list anyway but the fact that this has been in numerous James Bond films only makes it cooler and it’s place here even more prominent.

Aston Martin enlarged their DB4 engine and release this classic in 1963.  A number of other upgrades set it apart form it’s predecessor and it becam and instant success for those who could afford it.

A car that was once suggested to have as much swagger as it’s driver (James Bond), you could argue that it has even more.

Epitomising the cool and slim lines of the 60’s coupe, the Aston Martin DB5 became the iconic vision of important and famous people in sunglasses just turning the steering wheel randomly while a projector plays a winding English road behind them.

Subsequently, following the Bond films, it was once labelled “the most famous car in the world”, and at the time it was hard to argue.

The Goldfinger model

Chassis

2 door coupe

Engine

4.0 litre straight 6

Power Output

Up to 242 Kw

Transmission

5 speed manual or

3 speed automatic

DMC DeLorean

The name of the car (DMC DeLorean) won’t always mean anything to someone you know.  But if you say that cool looking car from back to the future with awesome butterfly opening doors – they’ll be able to picture it instantly.

Nope, we’ve never towed one, let alone having towed a car with a flux capacitator (fingers crossed) but let’s keep our hopes up shall we.  The DMC was never actually available in Australia, in fact, only 16 right hand drive were ever manufactured.

A few can still be located, exported here from the United States to various car cllectors, and are now valued way more than they originally were when first introduced.

The car itself is vastly underpowered compared to its popularity and it’s look, and was quite underwhelming as a sports car, even for it’s time.  Luckily however, the use of it in the Back to the Future trilogy cemented it’s place in car history.

I mean, come one, it’s not like we actually want to drive the thing.

We want to fly it.

Chassis

2 door coupe with butterfly opening doors

Engine

2.85 litre V6

Power Output

97 Kw 130 horse power

Transmission

5 speed manual

Or

3 speed automatic

The Batmobile

If batman ever breaks down – we want to be there!

You know, if he doesn’t already have his own service helicopter.

We tried looking up the specs for the batmobile and alas, came up fruitless.  You think that someday would have at least tried to fabricate something.  Perhaps it depends on which version you’re talking about.

Regardless, the machine must be an over performer and we assume it could out pace just about anything with 4 wheels.  Combined with its gadgets make it one of a young lad’s first dream car.

Reality is such a disappointment.

Oh, and for those that want to know, the first appearance of the vehicle was in Detective Comics  number 27 way back in May 1939.  It would probably give the A-type Fords a run or their money.

Roll Royce

Any model – any kind.

Well any of the expensive kinds.  If you have ever been on to an online car sales website and looked at a Rolls Royce, you can see just how expensive they can be.  Sure there are cheaper models going around, but  half a million, or even a million for a sedan!  Just because it has a fancy grill plate!

We would love to get our truck on to them just to see one of these up close to see exactly why they cost so much.

We assume that they are bullet proof in every shape and form and are used for diplomats in dangerous countries.

All jokes are side, the workmanship of these vehicles are meant to be far superior, and the things are meant to run like clockwork for long periods of time.  Apparently 65 percent of all Rolls Royce vehicles are still on the road they continue to run that good.  Astonishing!

As for workmanship, the interiors are normally hand crafted to a level unmatched by other manufacturers.

Whatever, we just want to tear one down the street and see how they go.

Jaguar E-Type

A classic car if you’ve ever seen one.

This British sports car was manufactured between 1961 and 1975.  It ticked all the right boxes.  IT dazzled with it’s looks and it performed to match.  It was also (relatively) affordable given its stature.  Not everyone could buy one but it wasn’t always out of everyone’s reach either.

TO show you it’s status at the time, a guy you may have heard of (if not, his last name should give it away) Enzo Ferrari, once called it the most beautiful car ever made.

With its extended long hood putting the drive way back in the chassis, this looked every bit the part it was meant to play.  A cool and chic vehicle that more than lived up to the changing trends of the 60’s.

The fact that it performed as well as it looked with great handling, made it every automotive enthusiasts dream car at the time.

These babies still go well over 100, 000 dollars so start saving

Series 1 E-type Jaguar

Chassis

2 door coupe or roadstar

Engine

3.8 litre I6 or 4.2 litre I6

Power Output

198 KW 265 horse power

Transmission

4 speed manul

3 speed automatic

TVR Cerbera Speed 12 

Only a concept car, there could be a range of similar cars in it’s place.  With a whopping 7.7 litre 12 cylinder v shaped engine this thing puts out 800 horsepower or 600 kilo watts.

I’m not even sure if that can legally drive on the road.

We love these concept cars though, and we know we will never have a chance to tow them (or at least it’s unlikely) but they definitely deserved a mention.

This thing can reach 60 miles an hour, which is 97 kilometres an hour, in under 3 seconds.  Well, 2.9 seconds exactly.  That’s crazy.  Fortunately its superior engineering allows it have breaks that can handle such speeds and a chassis that provides enough down force so that you can actually mange and steer the thing.

It was once reviewed as being – terrifyingly quick.

Scary.

Chassis

2 door coupe

Engine

7.7 litre V12

Power Output

600 KW 800 horse power

Transmission

6 speed manual

T type Ford

Let me take you back to the beginning.  Of time, no.  But where the automotive industry really kicked off.

First manufactured in 1908 many argue that this here was indeed the first fully affordable car for the average person (average being middle class mind you).

Due mainly to Fords vision of a efficient assembly line, these babies were cranked aout at a price never seen before, forever changing the transport landscape.

Would you rather be riding a horse?

The very first model sold for only $825 dollars ( approximately $25K by todays standard)

Although it had a 2.9 litre engine, it only produced 20 horsepower and had a top speed of only roughly 40 miles an hour, or 70 kilometres.

It only had two gears!  Even the worst automatic driver could figure that out.

Not to mention the lack of decent suspension.

Still, these rare beasts are a true gem and would love to tow, find or drive one day

Chassis

Oldie but a goodie

Engine

2.9  litre Inline 4

Power Output

15 Kw or 20 horsepower

Transmission

3 speed manual

A type ford

Aaah the A type.  It’s hard to look at this old beast and think, well they really improved on the old model (The t- typle ford).

We love the old cars thought and have a seen a few in our time but never had to tow one.  We think that’s great, too see them still going strong.

The first one produced was in 1927 and manufacturing only continued for 4 years (until 1931) until Ford again upgraded their designs.  These babies however won a place in everybody’s heart due to their classic look and place in history.

In a time when horses still outnumbered cars, over one million vehicles were sold in the first year and a half, and then in the next six months, another million following that.  It’s hard to imagine the road littered with these old cars these days but I guess that’s whats so special when you see just one of them on the road today.

Chassis

Oldie but a goodie

Engine

3.3 litre Inline 4

Power Output

30 Kw or 40 horsepower

Transmission

3 speed manual

Lotus Seven

We love all Lotus built cars – not that we get to tow them.

Setting the tone for all future Lotus vehicles, this gem of a roadster was introduced in 1957 and while it’s design continued to look antique, stayed in production until 1972.

Although used for racing, the original model had a vastly underperforming engine for it’s time but it’s retro look built a fan base that only grew with time.

Chassis

Roadster

Engine

1.2 litre inline 4

Power Output

30Kw 40 horsepower

Lotus Elite (original)

We love all Lotus built cars – not that we get to tow them.

It’s hard to say what the “typical” lotus look is, as many would say the Lotus Seven, but we feel the Elite is just as classic.

Only in production from 1958 until 1963, this car started a trend towards fibreglass bodies that made cars lighter, getting more drive out of the same engine.

Like the Jaguar of its time, this stylish look cemented itself in history, although like many Lotus cars, didn’t have a large engine.

Still, it was a popular racing ca in it’s division and it’s shape and style have etched itself into the history of car lovers everywhere.

Chassis

2 door coupe

Engine

1.2 litre 4 inline engine

Power Output

55 KW 75 horsepoer

Transmission

4 speed manual